Match your passion for Christian service with our passion for teaching and learning.

The Emmanuel College School of Christian Ministries (SCM) exists to teach, train, and disciple leaders of God’s Kingdom while nurturing Christian community. The Master of Divinity (MDiv) program will not only broaden students’ perspectives, but also deepen the integration of Christian faith and learning into their personal lives and advanced ministry pursuits.

Committed to a lifestyle of Word and Spirit, the SCM professors at Emmanuel care deeply about our students and their callings to serve God in the present age. The MDiv program builds upon a biblically-sound, theological foundation preparing students for the many joys and challenges of vocational ministry. Completing the MDiv degree also provides the credentials necessary for students who desire to continue graduate and post graduate studies towards a terminal degree in fields such as Bible, Theology, Christian Ministries, and Chaplaincy.

Sample Courses coming soon!.

 

 

>MASTER OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM (76 hrs)

  • GS500 – Introduction to Graduate Studies and Research (1 hr):  Graduate studies require the ability to comprehend, thinking critically about, and interact with scholars in a field of study. This course will provide an overview of those skills, with particular emphasis on research and writing competencies that are foundational for engaging critical questions and theories at the forefront of a scholarly discipline.
  • GR500 – Using Greek in Ministry (3 hrs):  This course provides an introduction to exegetical Greek for ministry. Particular emphasis is placed on inductive learning of exegetical Greek which includes mastery of the pronunciation of words and the development of a basic understanding of Koine Greek grammar. This course also explores the use of standard exegetical tools, Bible study software, and important linguistic and genre considerations for interpreting the texts of the New Testament
  • HE500 – Using Hebrew in Ministry (3 hrs):This course provides an introduction to exegetical Hebrew for ministry. Particular emphasis is placed on inductive learning of exegetical Hebrew which includes mastery of the pronunciation of words and the development of a basic understanding of Hebrew grammar. This course also explores the use of standard exegetical tools, Bible study software, and important linguistic and genre considerations for interpreting the texts of the Old Testament.
  • BI500 – Old Testament Introduction (3 hrs):

    This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Old Testament focusing on history, literature, and interpretation. Along with consideration of the history surrounding the Old Testament and its development, the traditional introductory elements such as authorship, date, genre, and structure of each writing are also examined. Attention is also given to the various methods and principles used to properly interpret the materials that comprise the Old Testament.

  • BI510 – New Testament Introduction (3 hrs):

    This course serves as an introduction to the study of the New Testament which includes its historical/cultural background, literary content, and interpretation. Along with consideration of the historical/cultural milieu in which the New Testament was developed, the traditional introductory elements such as authorship, date, genre, and structure of each writing are also examined. Attention is also given to the various methods and principles used to properly interpret the materials that comprise the New Testament.

  • BI520 – Biblical Interpretation (3 hrs):

    This course considers the formation and transmission of the biblical canon, the presuppositions related to biblical authority, and the principles and methods that serve to provide a basis for proper interpretation of the biblical text. Students will develop and practice the skills necessary to interpret both the Old and New Testaments. Consideration will also be given to the interpretive approaches practiced within the global Christian community.

  • BI530 – Torah Through the Old Testament (3 hrs):

    The Torah or ‘instruction’ given to Israel at the birth of the nation provides the essential template for the communities of faith in both the Old and New Testament; a template that describes our relationship with both God and neighbor as part of that community. This course considers the central role that Torah plays in casting God’s vision for his redeemed people and focuses on the ways that Torah provides a central purpose directing each writer and a unifying theme for the Old Testament as a whole.

  • BI540 – Synoptics (3 hrs):

    This course is an examination of the nature and purpose of the Synoptic Gospels and of the life, teachings, and actions of Jesus. Following an introductory section treating the genre of the Synoptic Gospels and methodological issues and approaches to them, students then consider overviews of each Gospel regarding their structure, features, and the major and distinctive contributions of each evangelist. Attention is directed to the synoptic portrayal of events in the life of Jesus, a comparison of the three Gospels, and significant topics of Jesus’ teaching. 

  • BI610 – Pauline Literature (3 hrs):

    This course examines Pauline writings within the literary, linguistic, historical, and socio-cultural contexts in which they were originally written and circulated. It does so within the context of the life and ministry of Paul, and the rise of early Christianity as recorded in the New Testament book of Acts. Each letter is examined with respect to its rhetoric, intentions, historical setting, and theological themes. The contribution of each writing, as well as its fit within Paul’s overall theology, is also considered. Throughout the course attention is given to the practical applications of the letters for spiritual formation and ministry.

  •  TH500 – History of the Church and Pentecostalism I (3 hrs):

    This course examines the story of the Church from its inception to the Protestant Reformation by tracing the irreversible shift brought about when Constantine made Christianity the State religion, the geo-political upheaval resulting from Rome’s fall, the ‘re-birth’ of human inquiry in the Renaissance, and the forming of many ‘churches’ in the Protestant Reformation. Part of this growth includes the consistent expression of Charisma and the activity of the Holy Spirit throughout this early history of the Church. A regular feature of the course will be to identify parallels between the historic and contemporary churches.

  • TH501 – History of the Church and Pentecostalism II (3 hrs):

    This course continues to examine the Church’s story with the emergence of Pietism amidst the Catholic and Protestant conflict and will trace the Holiness and Healing movements of the 19th century which flowed into the classic Pentecostal outpouring at the beginning of the twentieth century. Attention is given to the secularization of the Church, the birth of global missions, and the reformation of the Catholic Church as they have impacted the birth of the Charismatic Movement and subsequent ‘waves’ of Pentecostalism. The course will culminate with a look at the emerging global, non-western Church.

  • TH600 – Old Testament Theology (3 hrs):

    A theological study of the Old Testament attends to ‘big ideas’ highlighted and developed as Israel explores their relationship with God. This course encourages students to listen to the diverse voices and unique perspectives of the biblical writers, while noting themes that recur, evolve, and give shape to the larger message of the canon of Scripture as a whole. Attention will be given to contemporary approaches to biblical theology and to interpreting and proclaiming Scripture.

  • TH610 – New Testament Theology (3 hrs):

    This course addresses the general content and historical development of New Testament theology within the framework of the contemporary approach to biblical theology. Attention is given to the major themes and theological development of the New Testament documents. in their historical/cultural settings as they contribute to the overarching theology of the New Testament. Students will be encouraged to develop biblical/theological thinking regarding major theological issues and their impact on the life and ministry of the Church.

  • TH620 – Street Theology (3 hrs)
  •  MN500 – Christian Formation for Church Leaders (3 hrs):

    This course explores formational processes of conformation to the image of Jesus, frequently referred to as Christian spiritual formation. This is achieved by examining biblical models and practices, as well as surveying Christian approaches to spiritual formation throughout Church history. Attention will also be given to the adaptation of these practices for individual and communal application.

  • MN510 – Spirit-led Biblical Leadership (3 hrs):

    This course examines spiritual leadership through the lens of scripture and current theoretical frameworks. Emphasis is given to various aspects of and approaches to leadership which serve to guide spiritual leaders within the body of Christ. In addition, it explores practical application and best practices in learning to lead ourselves and others more effectively.

  • MN520 – Church Strategies and Systems (3 hrs):

    This course investigates management systems and practical strategies for sustaining excellence and fruitfulness in the church. Emphasis is given to best practices in management, systems development, strategic thinking, and scalable frameworks for church growth and kingdom expansion.

  • MN600 – Models for Church Planting and Revitalization (3 hrs):

    This course offers theological and methodological investigation into God’s desires and designs for local churches. Students will learn practical approaches for establishing Gospel-centered, Spirit-filled, missional churches that disciple believers, reach unbelievers, and influence communities. Attention is given to church launch strategies, church culture shifting, leadership development, and spiritual foundations within a global context.

  • MN610 – Pastoral Care and Counseling (Pastoral Theology) (3 hrs): This course provides a theological overview of pastoral care and counseling, emphasizing the Christian leader as a caregiver in congregational settings. The course examines academic and biblically based models and strategies for relational, emotional, and spiritual well-being within the complex and unique context of the church.  
  • MN620 – Telling the Story (Homiletics)  (3 hrs):

    This course seeks to facilitate a critical understanding of theology and theory in the practice of preaching as an act of worship and as witness to the gospel of Jesus Christ. The course accentuates preaching as both a gift of the Holy Spirit and human vocation which serves the Christian community for the sake of the world. The course approaches the task of preaching as an art that integrates biblical exegesis, theological interpretation, and practical application. Focus is given to various contemporary preaching models with special attention given to developing transformational expository sermons that communicate biblical life and truth.

  • MN630 – Contextualizing Ministry in a Changing World (Post Pandemic) (3 hrs):

    This course gives particular attention to the rapid pace of global change and the Church’s needed response. Students will discover the technological, theological, and communal nuances of present-day ministry in a worldwide context and the implementation of effective models and best practices for maximized ministerial reach and influence.

  • MN640 – Missional Ministry (3 hrs): Attaining and maintaining a perspective of God’s activity in the world, both locally and globally, is vital for church leaders. This course presents a biblically framed ‘big picture’ of the mission of God, expressing itself with cultural and contextual relevance. Emphasis is placed upon the Great Commission and Great Commandment as the basis for localized Gospel expression.
  • BI 615 – Apocalyptic Literature (3 hrs):

    This course surveys Apocalyptic Literature in three periods: The Old Testament, the Intertestamental, and the Early Christian/Jewish literature (including the New Testament). Consideration is given to the process by which the imagery is developed and redeployed in later periods. The historical situations which gave rise to the literature, the characteristics, and the different interpretive approaches are also studied in dialogue with Christian scholarly and popular/cultural views. Attention is also given to how the literature relates to the Christian message of the eschatological hope of the kingdom of God, and how Christians might appropriate the message of the literature into their lives and in the life of the church.

  • BI 625 – Gospel and Letters of John (3 hrs):

    This course surveys the historical situations, interpretive approaches, and the literary and theological contexts of the Gospel and letters attributed to John. These writings are then examined with emphasis given to exegetical work and interpretive projects that nurture the skills necessary for responsible interpretation. Additionally, an understanding of the relationship between early Christian communities, issues they faced, and how these might inform and be appropriated by contemporary Christians is considered.

  • BI 635 – Old Testament Prophets (3 hrs):

    The Prophets, more than any other Old Testament writers, reveal their messages through God’s active working out of his plans in human history. This course will explore closely the connection between the prophets’ messages and the historical events about which they spoke. Consideration will also be given to the task of speaking prophetically in our contemporary historical context.

  • MN 615 – Theology and Praxis of Worship (3 hrs):

    This course considers biblical and historical views of worship as they connect liturgical practices with contemporary, charismatic expression. Attention will be given to the role of the Spirit, the instruction of the Word, and the influence of tradition. Additionally, worship theory and theology will connect with application in the gathered church and individual life.

  • MN 625 – Street Ministry (Pastor, Church and World) (3 hrs):

    This course explores both the challenges and the potential impact of the Church regarding contemporary cultural and societal issues. The course seeks to prepare Christian leaders for effective ministry within the complexities of an ever-changing world. Special emphasis is placed upon contextualization and the interaction between social forces with attention given to identifying and nurturing qualities necessary for missional leaders and communities.

  • MN 635 – Biblically Based Discipleship (3 hrs):

    This course engages the tension that, while the Kingdom of God expands, church leaders must continually explore means to foster intimacy with God, relational accountability, and the capacity to reproduce the life of Christ in others. In addition to theoretical perspectives of personal discipleship, the class also focuses on best practices of faith formation within the local church.

  • GR 615 – New Testament Greek I (3 hrs):

    This is the first of a two-course sequence that presents the essentials of elementary Greek. Attention is given to the study of grammatical forms, syntax, and vocabulary that prepares students to read the New Testament in its original language.

  • GR 625 – New Testament Greek II (3 hrs):

    This is the second of a two-course sequence that presents the essentials of elementary Greek. Continued attention is given to the study of grammatical forms, syntax, and vocabulary that prepares students to read the New Testament in its original language. In addition, attention is also given to ways in which New Testament Greek studies can provide grammatical and exegetical insights for preaching and teaching the New Testament.

  • GR 635 – Intermediate Greek Grammar and Exegesis (3 hrs):

    This course provides a review and elaboration of Greek grammatical forms, syntax, and vocabulary, enabling students to move beyond mere reading of the New Testament to doing more in-depth grammatical-historical exegesis. In addition, the praxis of textual criticism will be introduced.

  • GS 690 – Capstone Experience (3 hrs): This course serves as a culmination to a student’s program by providing an opportunity for an internship, a mentored project, or a research-based thesis.